Book Review: Magical Negro by Morgan Parker

mnMagical Negro by Morgan Parker
Published: 2019
Genre: Poetry
Format: Paperback
Pages: 112
Source: Library
Dates Read: March 14-16, 2019
Grade: C+
Synopsis: Magical Negro is an archive of Black everydayness, a catalog of contemporary folk heroes, an ethnography of ancestral grief, and an inventory of figureheads, idioms, and customs. These American poems are both elegy and jive, joke and declaration, songs of congregation and self-conception. They connect themes of loneliness, displacement, grief, ancestral trauma, and objectification, while exploring and troubling tropes and stereotypes of Black Americans. Focused primarily on depictions of Black womanhood alongside personal narratives, the collection tackles interior and exterior politics—of both the body and society, of both the individual and the collective experience. In Magical Negro, Parker creates a space of witness, of airing grievances, of pointing out patterns. In these poems are living documents, pleas, latent traumas, inside jokes, and unspoken anxieties situated as firmly in the past as in the present—timeless Black melancholies and triumphs. (from Goodreads)

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ARC Review: There Are Girls Like Lions

tagll.pngThere Are Girls Like Lions, foreword by Cole Swensen
Publication Date: March 5, 2019
Genre: Poetry
Format: eARC
Pages: 99
Source: NetGalley
Date Read: February 9, 2019
Grade: C+
Synopsis: For mothers, daughters, sisters, wives, partners, and friends, here are 30 stirring poems about the experience of being a woman. Rousing and empowering, There Are Girls like Lions is a celebration of womanhood in all its dimensions, including love, beauty, friendship, motherhood, work, aging, and much more. Packaged in an attractive case with foil stamping and featuring striking illustrations in metallic ink throughout, this powerful collection will resonate as a gift for any modern woman. (from Goodreads)
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Book Review: The Colonel’s Lady by Laura Frantz

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The Colonel’s Lady by Laura Frantz
Published: 2011
Genre: Christian, Historical Romance
Format: Kindle
Pages: 417
Source: Library
Dates Read: February 6-12, 2019
Grade: C+
Synopsis: In 1779, when genteel Virginia spinster Roxanna Rowan arrives at the Kentucky fort commanded by Colonel Cassius McLinn, she finds that her officer father has died. Penniless and destitute, Roxanna is forced to take her father’s place as scrivener. Before long, it’s clear that the colonel himself is attracted to her. But she soon realizes the colonel has grave secrets of his own–some of which have to do with her father’s sudden death. Can she ever truly love him? (from Goodreads)

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Book Review: Virgin by Analicia Sotelo

vTitle: Virgin
Author: Analicia Sotelo
Published: 2018
Genre: P
Format: Paperback
Pages: 95
Source: Library
Date Read: April 11, 2018
Grade: C+
Synopsis: Selected by Ross Gay as winner of the inaugural Jake Adam York Prize, Analicia Sotelo’s debut collection of poems is a vivid portrait of the artist as a young woman.

In Virgin, Sotelo walks the line between autobiography and myth-making, offering up identities like dishes at a feast. These poems devour and complicate tropes of femininity–of naiveté, of careless abandon–before sharply exploring the intelligence and fortitude of women, how “far & wide, / how dark & deep / this frigid female mind can go.” At every step, Sotelo’s poems seduce with history, folklore, and sensory detail–grilled meat, golden habaneros, and burnt sugar–before delivering clear-eyed and eviscerating insights into power, deceit, relationships, and ourselves.

Blistering and gorgeous, Virgin is an audacious act of imaginative self-mythology from one of our most promising young poets.

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It’s the Great Catch-up Round-up of June/July 2017, Charlie Brown!

So you may have noticed that I’ve been a bit AWOL lately, and that’s because I just haven’t been in the right head space for a few weeks.  But now I’m back in action, okay?  Am I forgiven?

Because of this, I’m really behind on reviews.  What I’ve decided to do is combine all of my remaining June and July reviews into this one post.  It shouldn’t be toooo long because I’m going to make the reviews short, but we’ll see.  (Spoiler: It’s kinda long.) Continue reading “It’s the Great Catch-up Round-up of June/July 2017, Charlie Brown!”

Book Review: Secrets of a Summer Night by Lisa Kleypas

13Title: Secrets of a Summer Night
Author: Lisa Kleypas
Series: Wallflowers #1
Released: October 26, 2004
Genres: HR
Format: Kindle
Pages: 346
Source: 
Own
Dates Read: June 19-22, 2017
Grade: C+
Synopsis: Four young ladies enter London society with one common goal: they must use their feminine wit and wiles to find a husband. So a daring husband-hunting scheme is born.

Annabelle Peyton, determined to save her family from disaster, decides to use her beauty and wit to tempt a suitable nobleman into making an offer of marriage. But Annabelle’s most intriguing — and persistent — admirer, wealthy, powerful Simon Hunt, has made it clear that while he will introduce her to irresistible pleasure he will not offer marriage. Annabelle is determined to resist his unthinkable proposition … but it is impossible in the face of such skillful seduction.

Her friends, looking to help, conspire to entice a more suitable gentleman to offer for Annabelle, for only then will she be safe from Simon — and her own longings. But on one summer night, Annabelle succumbs to Simon’s passionate embrace and tempting kisses … and she discovers that love is the most dangerous game of all. (Goodreads) Continue reading “Book Review: Secrets of a Summer Night by Lisa Kleypas”